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Ginger And Its Stunning Health Benefits

What is Ginger?

Ginger is a widely emanated south-east Asian flowering plant that is considered one of the most flavourful and healthiest spices of all time. Just like turmeric and cardamom, Ginger also belongs to the Zingiberaceae family. In India and China, Ginger plays a vital role in the regional diet. Ginger is mostly famous for its strong aroma, culinary, and remedial or healing properties. The rhizome part of the underground part of Ginger is mostly used.

Though Ginger is mostly popular amongst the common folk for its wide use in stewing dishes like gingerbread or Ginger biscuits, people have also been using this amazing ginger root since ancient times.


What Are The 5 Top Health Benefits Of Ginger?

Ginger has thousands of health benefits and here in this answer, we will discuss a few of the most important points regarding that.

1.    It’s helpful to appease the symptoms of a common cold: Ginger is one of the most commonly used home remedies to alleviate the symptoms of cold and sore throat. Strong-flavored hot Ginger tea could be a great option to get relief at the beginning or during a cold or cough as it reduces congestion and inflammation.


Being diaphoretic, ginger root or ginger also induces or promotes perspiration, and thus it can be utilized to deal with feverish health conditions like influenza or cold. Fresh ginger root encompasses gingerols and zingerone, which is why it has a very impressive antiviral property.

2.    Ginger to soothe mild nausea and morning sickness: Fresh Ginger can reduce the signs related to motion sickness, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, or cold sweats anecdotally. This also helps to reduce the symptoms associated with motion sickness. Furthermore ginger could help people, who are undergoing surgery and chemotherapy to cope up with nausea, though regarding this more distinct research is required.

Homemade Gingerale
Around 1 gram or 1.5 gram of Ginger is enough to treat nausea and vomiting correlated with mild pregnancy sickness. Still, consult with your GP or midwife to assure whether it is appropriate for you or not.

3.    It may be helpful with pains and aches: Gigger is loaded with various curative properties related to its strong anti-inflammatory qualities. As per the recent studies, due to these potent anti-inflammatory qualities of Ginger, it seems to be suitable for topical use, and with the use of a ginger compress symptoms related to osteoarthritis can be reduced significantly. Topical applications of ginger oil or fresh ginger root may also boost blood circulation and soothe burns.

Ginger or more specifically ginger root that is widely used in different forms of medicine is enriched with different volatile natural oils that comprise bioactive compounds like gingerol. This potent anti-inflammatory compound is speculated to clarify why people with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis should consume ginger regularly to reduce their pain levels and improve mobility.

4.    Ginger Improve the digestive system: Ginger can be an effective solution to treat chronic indigestion, distinguished by intermittent pain and distress in the upper part stomach. As carminative ginger stimulates and speeds up the elimination of excess gas from the digestive system. This is also known for soothing the intestinal tract. Ginger works well to reduce the Discomfort or problems related to Colic and function dyspepsia.

Himalayan Sweet Ginger Chutney

5.    Scientifically proven to support heart health: Various studies on animals indicated that ginger could be very much helpful to manage cholesterol levels. This is also helpful to reduce and even prevent damage to the arteries and lower high blood pressure. Altogether ginger is beneficial for the heart and cardiovascular system. Despite these health benefits ginger also promotes weight loss, lower blood sugar level, reduces menstrual pain and prevents the risk of cancer to some extent.

Crunchy texture and sharp flavour of ginger with a twist

Is Ginger Safe For Everyone?
Ginger, also known as Amomum Zingiber, is predominantly considered safe for a broad range of illnesses. But as ginger is a strong herb and functions pharmacologically, so there is a possibility that it can be unsuitable for some people, including:

  • People who have a medical history of oxalate-containing kidney stones.
  • Also, those who often experience heartburn or acid reflux.
  • Those with low blood pressure or on blood pressure medications.
  •  People with bleeding or blood clotting disorder;
  • People suffering from any serious heart disease.

These types of people must consume ginger in moderate quantity due to its potential blood-pressure-lowering effects. If you’re a little confused or concerned about whether having ginger is safe for you or not, then consult a physician.

Frequently Asked Questions

What happens when you eat ginger daily?
Having ginger in daily life can aid you to cope up with various health-related hardships. It helps to alleviate, prevent and heal inflammation.

According to one of the recent research studies, it’s proven that ginger could noticeably curtail allergic reactions, which is associated with inflammation. A small study also illustrated that those people who took daily ginger supplements experienced less muscle pain after working out, as primarily, inflammation is the major cause of muscle pain. Furthermore, Various research insinuates that daily consumption of ginger can significantly reduce the risk of chronic heart diseases as it lowers hypertension. This flavourful herb is also useful in preventing heart attacks and lowering bad cholesterol levels.

The best accompaniment to any north Indian meal

What does ginger do to the brain?
Ginger is one of the most specific and rich sources of antioxidants and bioactive compounds, and due to the presence of that, it significantly lessens inflammation that occurs in the brain. Reserve has also shown that ginger can boost up brain function and act as brain food.
In 2011, a study was conducted over 60 healthy middle-aged ladies and that research demonstrated that ginger can improve both attention or vigilance and cognitive process. This is also helpful to prevent neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s.

Who should not take ginger? 
Though ginger is considered one of the most worshipped herbs or spices for its strong flavor and medicinal properties, there are few people with certain health conditions who should not take ginger daily, like people with critical cardiac conditions, diabetes, bleeding or blood clotting-related problems, and gallstones. These people should consult with their doctor before taking ginger as a supplement. Also in some cases pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid  ginger. Furthermore, don’t take more than 4 grams of ginger on a single day.

Adrak Ka Achar by Masala Monk

Is ginger good for blood pressure?
Ginger, an aromatic herb and traditional medicine in India and China is being used for its healing and anti-inflammatory property for thousands of years. This can lower blood pressure and boost up blood circulation. Research on both humans and animals shows that ginger can truly reduce high blood pressure levels that affect blood flow cynically.

What does ginger do in the body of a woman?
Ginger is a common remedy for treating upset stomach and nausea and this is also scientifically verified. Ginger appears to be helpful in digestion and saliva flow. Research has also illustrated the fact that consuming ginger could alleviate nausea and vomiting in some pregnant women.

Is ginger good for the lungs?
One of the extensively adopted home treatments to ease cough and cold is ginger, that is mostly known for its anti-inflammatory properties. Also, due to this anti-inflammatory and bioactive property, it helps to wipe out toxins from the respiratory tract. It comprises of multiple vitamins and minerals like potassium, magnesium, beta-carotene, and zinc.

How does ginger reduce blood sugar?

Ginger root or rhizome contains gingerols, the major bioactive compound, this is said to increase the uptake of glucose into muscle cells without taking advantage of insulin, and thus it may be helpful in the management of high blood sugar levels. It’s also crucial to know that ginger has a very low glycemic index (GI) that’s why it breaks down gradually to crop up glucose and therefore it does not accelerate the spikes of blood sugar levels as other high GI foods do.

What are the side effects of ginger?
The famous south-east Asian herb, ginger may result in some mild side effects like heartburn, diarrhea, burping, and common discomfort in the stomach. Few folks have also reported menstrual bleeding and clotting of blood is intensified while taking ginger. The application of ginger juice on the skin is found to be safe for a short time but could feel a little irritable when applied for a longer period.

That’s all said and done ,

You name the problem and ginger is the solution, there are enough reason to include ginger in your diet.

Some of the best way to use ginger daily in your diet as add ginger pickle in your meal, ginger honey lemon tea, ginger chutney or drink some fresh ginger ale, Make fresh ginger lemonade, Add It to a Smoothie etc.

Masala monk have a great range of ginger products to help you include the same in your daily diet.
Sweet and Spicy Ginger Pickle-Homemade
Homemade Authentic Gingerale
Himalayan Sweet Ginger Chutney – 200 gms
Adrak ka Achar
Mukhwas Mania

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Pickle it Right: Are you storing it well?

MM_Blog_Pickleitright

Shakespeare contributed most of the phrases and metaphors to the English literature which is commonly used in our daily life all across the globe. His artistic freedom authorized him to introduce many more idioms and adjectives to the language, just like the roadside Dhabha wala bhaiya loads my plate of Rajma Chawal with chopped onions, green chillies, and a variety of vegetable pickles.

In 16th century, he peppered his plays “The tempest” with a phrase:

TRINCULO:
I have been in such a pickle since I saw you last that,
I fear me, will never out of my bones:
I shall not fear fly-blowing.

I wondered what pickle he was eating that made him pen down this statement and the following conclusion, because I am sure if he had tasted an Indian pickle (Achar), his tide would have turned.

Personally, dreaming about “Achar” fills me with a euphoric feeling. It takes me back to my childhood summer visits to my grandmother’s kitchen, which had lined up big glass jars, filled with mangoes pieces soaked in spices and mustard oil, covered with cotton cloth, and soaked in the bright summer sun. These mango pickles were then packed in airtight jars. A carefully prepared procedure of do’s and don’ts was followed so that these delicious pickles can last as long as possible while retaining its true taste. (And of course, she used to add a ton of love too).

In India, three main types of pickling techniques are practiced. These are preserving in oil, vinegar, or saltwater brine, out of which the oil recipe is most commonly practiced. As these recipes have passed on from generations, so here comes the real question “Are we storing our pickles in the right way?” “Do you think you are the deserving heir of your family pickling techniques?” or “Are you ready to pass your family traditional pickling technique to your kids?

As most of the ingredients used in Indian pickles are natural preservatives, the amount and ways to use those preservatives play an important role while storing these pickles. Here are some tips straight from my grandmother’s diary which will help you to store your pickle like a pro!

  • While using oil as a preservative, you should always dry the fruits, vegetables or berries after slicing so that it releases all its moisture
  • Each slice of a pickle should be soaking in oil, which will prevent it from future air contact. You can ensure this by shaking the jar after filling
  • Always store your pickle in ceramic or glass jars
  • Make sure that your pickle jar is washed, dried, cleaned, and sterilized properly
  • Make sure you fill the jar to the brim and leave no space for air
  • Before closing the jar lid, place a makhmal/cotton cloth on the jar top. This further soaks any left out moisture inside
  • Occasionally, it’s recommended to keep your pickle jars in the sun for a few hours
  • Always use a dry stainless steel spoon to mix or to serve
  • Always store the jar in a cool and dry place
  • In case of pickles preserved in vinegar, avoid using metal lids
  • Add a desi delight to your Indian meal
  • karonda mirchi pickle Masala Monk
  • Homemade Kamrakh ka Achar
  • Homemade Tattaiya Chilli Pickle
  • Winter Special - Red Radish Pickle

As I dig into ancient Egyptian history and English literature, Cleopatra attributed her good looks to a hearty diet of pickles, but not to forget it was not just the good looks that made her the queen of the Nile. She was a great philosopher, mathematician, astronomer and knew a dozen of languages that made her so desirable. Pickle is like Cleopatra. It cannot be defined by just its taste and tanginess, it also carries a ton of healthy bacteria, along with a range of essential minerals & vitamins like B12, which helps in food digestion and provides antioxidants for the body. So why to regret tempting and drooling over a good jar of homemade pickle? Our love for anything in this universe isn’t supposed to be easy. But it should be worth it, so is making, storing & having a tasty pickle.

Before you enter your next pickle binge, do keep in mind that pickles have high levels of sodium and fats. Gorging it can cause an increase in body cholesterol level. So in order to keep enjoying your pickle, “eat your pickle like a pickle so you don’t end in a pickle”.